The only difference between adventure and disaster is preparedness.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Water Storage and Treatment Webinar


*This comes to us from Nitro-Pak, a disaster supply kit company.  They are offering a free water storage and treatment online webinar on Wednesday at 6:00 p.m.  Click on the "Reserve Your Spot Now" link to RSVP.
News of the Ebola virus and the approaching flu season should not cause us to panic, but it should remind us of another type of emergency we need to be prepared for: a quarantine.
Would your family be prepared to be isolated to avoid the outbreak of the flu or other illness?
Water should be at the top of your quarantine prep list. To help you be prepared, I want to offer you a chance to learn from emergency water expert Glenn Meder.
Glenn's webinar on how to purify water in an emergency situation generated one of the best response rates we've ever had.  That's why I've invited Glenn back to offer his FREE one-hour class again on Wednesday, October 22nd at 8 p.m. CDT, (9 p.m. EDT / 7 p.m. MDT / 6 p.m. PDT). 
We've invited Glenn back to show us how to provide safe drinking water independent of supply chains and pre-stored water supplies.  
Don't miss out on this vital education. Register now!  
Thanks!
Harry Weyandt
President, Nitro-Pak
 

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Why Drop, Cover, and Hold On?

The Great Washington Shake Out is coming!  On 10/16 at 10:16 a.m. over 800,000 Washingtonians have pledged to do a Drop, Cover, Hold earthquake drill.  Will you be one?

dropcoverholdon
Why is it important to do a Drop, Cover, and Hold On drill? To react quickly you must practice often. You may only have seconds to protect yourself in an earthquake, before strong shaking knocks you down--or drops something on you. Practicing helps you be ready to respond.
  • If you are inside a building, move no more than a few steps, then Drop, Cover and Hold On:
    • DROP to the ground (before the earthquake drops you!),
    • Take COVER by getting under a sturdy desk or table, and
    • HOLD ON to it until the shaking stops.
    Stay indoors till the shaking stops and you are sure it is safe to exit. In most buildings in Washington you are safer if you stay where you are until the shaking stops.

  • If you in a low lying coastal area, immediately move inland and to higher ground because a tsunami could follow the earthquake. Do not return until local officials announce it is safe to reenter coastal areas.

  • If you are outdoors when the shaking starts, you should find a clear spot away from buildings, trees, streetlights, and power lines, then Drop, Cover and Hold On. Stay there until the shaking stops.

  • If you are driving, pull over to a clear location, stop and stay there with your seatbelt fastened until the shaking stops. Once the shaking stops, proceed with caution and avoid bridges or ramps that might have been damaged.

Ground shaking during an earthquake is seldom the cause of injury. Most earthquake-related injuries and deaths are caused by collapsing walls and roofs, flying glass and falling objects. It is extremely important for a person to move as little as possible to reach the place of safety he or she has identified because most injuries occur when people try to move more than a short distance during the shaking.
Look around you now, before an earthquake. Identify safe places such as under a sturdy piece of furniture or against an interior wall in your home, office or school so that when the shaking starts you can respond quickly. An immediate response to move to the safe place can save lives. And that safe place should be within a few steps to avoid injury from flying debris.

Disaster Preparedness Activities That Don't Cost a Thing!


10 Totally Free Prepping Items To Do
From:

1. Learn to get around your house in the dark. Think about the days when you were a teenager and had to sneak in and out of your house without your parents hearing. You didn't do that? Oh. Moving on....

Learn your escape plan and be able to get around in the dark in case of no power or someone strange being in your house. This might mean you will have to clean your floors and move furniture so you can get around safely. Also, be sure your bag, purse, keys, phone, wallet, etc. is in one, logical place for you to find in the dark and get out safely.

2. Inventory your things. Do you know what you have? Where is it? What are you missing? You need to make an inventory of your prepping supplies and things with where the item is located. If the items can be easily located, you can respond to a situation or emergency much, much more quickly. This inventory should be for food, ammo, supplies, first aid supplies, etc. Everything should be inventoried.


3. Organize your food. Put your food together in logical groups: baking, vegetable, fruits, meats, spices, condiments, sauces, etc. Get even more specific than that - put all your salt together in one place, for example. Put items in plastic bags in glass jars so the food will last longer. Write the expiration dates clearly on the food items so you know to grab the oldest food first. Organize your food to have the oldest food in front and newest in the back or on the bottom. With everything organized, you can send your kids to get the food items you want without the stress of telling them 30,000 times where it is!

4. Can your meats. Look in your freezer and look at the meats that are easy to can. I like to can chicken, stew meat, ground meats, and turkey. If you lose power for multiple days, you can still have a good supply of meat to feed your family and reduce the waste of what you might lose. Meat is too expensive to waste!

5. Make a family preparedness plan. This is a good thing for the whole family can participate in. You need to decide where to go, where to meet, what to grab, how to act, and what to do. You need to make multiple plans in case that Plan A doesn't work, your family knows what to do otherwise. Make sure you also include emergency contacts, medical records, and an inventory of your household goods and keep them ALL in the same place.

6. Write out your priority/wish list. This one is my favorite to do and it keeps me focused! What do you want to get done around the property and house? What do you wish you could do or buy for your preparedness goals? Write down what you need to buy or make. Take this list shopping with you or keep it buy the computer in case you get a little money for those items. Dreaming and planning cost nothing!

7. Practice your skills! Practice those skills which you feel you need refining. Practice makes you better! If you feel your target shooting needs some practice, set up some cans on a fence post and start practicing! Fill a feed sack or a pet food bag with grass clipping or dead leaves. Get the bow and arrow out and start practicing! Need to get more comfortable with sewing? Get some material out and make a pillow while practicing making a straight seam. The possibilities are endless!

8. Complete projects! I have projects that I have all the stuff I need for the project, I just haven't done it. I have started projects and I haven't finished them. I have total confidence I am not the only one! Get your projects done!

9. Organize, clean out, put together your Every Day Carry (EDC) Bag. This can be your purse, a tote bag, backpack, or whatever you feel comfortable carrying with you in the car or everywhere you go. Everyone carries different things with them and most of what you carry depends on where you are at in life (baby, kids, no kids). I like to carry extra cash, flashlight, personal items, knife, scissors, pens/pencils, food, small first-aid kit, small sewing kit, gloves, hat, and other things I might need. This bag is what would be your go-to bag as well as your bag you grab if you need to walk anywhere due to car breakdowns, emergencies, etc.

10. Clean out your vehicles and check their fluids and tires. Anytime is a good time to vacuum out the vehicle and get the trash out of it. Wipe down the surfaces and organize what needs to stay in the vehicle. When you get down with that, check the fluid levels in the vehicles and check the tire pressure. Top off what needs to be topped off and pump up the tires if needed. Your vehicle needs to be ready to go anytime you are!

With winter and weekend coming, now is a good time to get these things done! You will not spend any money if you don't want to. If you find yourself in a position where you might, see if you have anything that might work in its place! Be creative!

Thursday, September 25, 2014

6.2 Earthquake Reported near Anchorage, AK

From Northwest Cable News

A 6.2 earthquake shook parts of southern Alaska on Thursday morning, but its depth suggested the impact on the small towns nearby could be modest.
The quake, estimated at a 6.2 magnitude, was centered 60 miles west northwest of Willow, Alaska, and 81 miles northwest of Anchorage.

The quake struck at a depth of 63 miles. In contrast, the magnitude 6 earthquake near Napa, Calif. was at a depth of 7 miles.

Alaska is the most seismically active U.S. state. Many Alaskans fear a quake along the lines of the 1964 "Good Friday" earthquake, which caused 139 deaths, mostly from a related tsunami.
The town of Willow, with a population of 2,300 people, might be familiar to some outside Alaska because it's reportedly the source of name of Willow Palin, daughter of former candidate for vice president Sarah Palin.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

It Doesn't Cost A Lot To Be Prepared!

--By Darryl J. Madden, Director of the Ready Campaign

It is no secret that many families and individuals are looking to cut back on spending.  But with the frequency of disaster, both natural and manmade, can you afford not to be prepared?  Preparedness doesn't have to cost an arm and a leg.

September is National Preparedness Month, and we are asking you to help your family and friends prepare for whatever may come.  Here are a few tips on how you can protect those that matter to you without spending a fortune:

Make A Plan.  Work with your family and neighbors to make an emergency plan for the types of disasters that affect your area.  Make sure everyone in your family understands where to go and what to do in case of an emergency.  You can download Family Emergency Plan templates at www.ready.gov.

Update Contact Information.  Having accurate records for family, friends and neighbors will help you stay in contact and possibly help those in need.  Make sure updated contact information is posted in visible places throughout your house and workplace.

Check Your Policy.  Review your insurance policy annually and make any necessary changes--renters, too!  When a disaster strikes, you want to know that your coverage will get you back on your feet.

Make a Ready List.  You may not need all of the items in ready-made preparedness kits.  Choose the essentials that fit your needs and budget.  Don't forget to keep supplies at work and in your car.  Sample Ready Lists can be found at www.ready.gov, use these as inspiration.

Plan Your Purchases.  You can save money by thinking ahead.  Don't buy preparedness items just before a storm when they're expensive and supplies will be in high demand.  Buy items at the end of the season when you can get better deals.

Shop Sales.  Shop at sales and used goods stores.  Buy items throughout the year, instead of all at once, and you won't notice the cost as much.

Make Sure it Keeps.  Store water in a safe containers.  You don't need to buy bottled water, just make sure your water containers are disinfected, airtight and stored in a cool, dark place.

Request a Gift.  We all get things we just don't need.  Suggest preparedness supplies as gifts from your friends and family.  It just might save your life!

Trade a Night Out.  Trade one night out to fund your 72-hour kit.  Taking a family of 4 to the movies can cost upwards of $80.  Just one night of staying in could fund your Ready kit.

The best tip is to start now.  Take small steps toward preparedness and before you know it, you will be ready!

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Welcome Fall!

Well, Autumn sure is in a hurry!  From the National Weather Service:
The first organized storm system of the season for NW OR and SW WA arrives tonight. An early fall storm system will bring a drastic change in weather overnight into Wednesday.  The main weather impact will be widespread moderate to heavy rain that will spread inland from the coast tonight.

Rainfall totals by the end of the day Wednesday are expected to be mainly between half an inch to one and a half inches.  This may result in some ponding of water in low lying areas.

Motorists are urged to use caution on the roadways.  Given the long period of dry weather that has preceded this front, residual oil and grease on the road surfaces can become slick.

Friday, September 19, 2014

Food For Your Emergency Kit

from www.ready.gov
Welcome to week three of National Preparedness Month! This week we’re zeroing in on how to build an emergency kit.  One of the most important parts of your emergency kit is food!  When packing for an emergency kit, you need to consider what kinds of food to pack and how much. Thankfully, Ready.gov offers a few tips on how to stock your kit with the food you will need:

·       Have at least a three-day supply of non-perishable foods; peanut butter, protein bars and ready-to-eat canned fruits and vegetables are a few examples;

·       Choose foods that your family will actually eat so no one goes hungry;

·       Remember to pack foods that do not conflict with anyone’s dietary needs;

·       Avoid foods that will make you thirsty; and

·       Pack salt-free crackers, whole grain cereals and canned foods.