The only difference between adventure and disaster is preparedness.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Want to Help Out Cowlitz Dive Rescue?


Cowlitz County Dive Rescue is participating in the GiveMore 24 fundraising event today.  The funds we raise will be used for member training and the specialized gear our member use, the completion of the trailer we will use for swift water call, and having the dive gear serviced.   Please use the link below to donate.
CCDR is a non-profit, 100% volunteer-based, donation supported organization in SouthWest Washington that works with the law enforcement and fire agencies. We are called to multiple counties.  We also participate in educational activities, such as school assemblies, Kid’s Safety Days, etc.

Please use the link below to donate to our cause.   Any amount is appreciated. 
Cowlitz County Dive Rescue is participating in the GiveMore 24 fundraising event today.  The funds we raise will be used for member training and the specialized gear our member use, the completion of the trailer we will use for swift water call, and having the dive gear serviced.   Please use the link below to donate.
 
 

Safeguarding Your Savings


 

From www.ready.gov

So, you are familiar with the hazards most likely to impact your community, and you have an emergency kit, an evacuation plan, and a family communications plan. You have even taken action to prepare your pets. But what about your finances? Pre-disaster financial planning is essential to help you and your family maintain financial stability in the event of an emergency. You should have a plan to pay your bills and access important records and accounts after a disaster, when mail services may be delayed, original documentation may be damaged or lost, or Internet access may not be available. It is also a good idea to have cash on hand to cover your expenses in case banks are also impacted by disaster. Protecting your financial records also facilitates the process of applying for income-based assistance following a disaster.

Take some time to review a few of these tips on financial preparedness:

·       Place important documents in a safe space. You can use the Safeguarding Your Valuables activity and Emergency Financial First Aid Kit to help get you started.  These documents provide the basics of how to identify valuables and what low-cost options are available to protect them.

·       Use the FEMA phone application to access disaster preparedness, response and recovery resources including disaster assistance.

·       Enroll in Go Direct to minimize disruptions in receiving any federal benefits you may be entitled.

·       Explore other resources to help you get started including Recovery After Disaster: The Family Financial Toolkit and the Disaster Recovery Log which can help your family get back on their feet after a disaster.

The Financial Literacy Education Commission can help you increase the financial preparedness of your household, workplace, and community. We encourage you to use the tools listed above or visit Ready.gov/financialpreparedness. Start early on being financially prepared!

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Safe on My Own

Safe on My Own is a fantastic class through Longview Parks and Rec that teaches 8-12 year olds how to handle being home alone, basic first aid, personal safety, internet safety, sibling care and more.  The next offering is September 20th from 9:00 a.m. to noon in Longview.  For cost and location information, contact Longview Parks and Rec at (360) 442-5400.

Free Disaster Preparedness Presentation

Do you want more information on how to be better prepared for disasters?  Join us on Tuesday, September 16th at 6:30 p.m. at Calvary Chapel, 902 Ash Street in Kelso for a FREE disaster preparedness presentation.  Topics include food and water storage, how to create a kit, what to prepare for and also enter to win disaster supplies!

For more information contact Jennifer at (360) 577-3130 or email DEM@co.cowlitz.wa.us

Monday, September 8, 2014

ABC's of School Emergency Planning

It’s September once again and that means children across the country are heading back to school!  Do you know the emergency plan at your child's school? What about the steps the school will take to share pertinent information with you? As a parent, it’s important to understand what will happen after a natural disaster or emergency at your child’s school.

Here are the ABC’s of what you should know about a school’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP):

A.    Always ensure your school has up-to-date evacuation plans, emergency kits and contact sheets. Ensure your school’s nurse has your child’s medical information and medications on hand. Ask your child’s teacher to walk you through their evacuation plan and show you their emergency kits.

B.     Be Prepared. Provide your school with your cell phone number, work phone number, and contact information for your relatives. If your child is old enough to carry a cell phone, make sure they know how to text you or a designated contact in case of an emergency. Also, be prepared to have a conversation with your child about emergencies and hazards.

C.     Coordinate with your child’s teachers and school officials to set a plan in place if there is not one. Guide them to Ready.gov for more resources and encourage the school to perform school wide drills and exercises as part of America’s PrepareAthon!

These ABCs, tools and resources are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to your child’s at-school safety. For more information on how to get started visit http://www.ready.gov/school-emergency-plans.

Brush up on First Aid/CPR

Learning First Aid/CPR skills is one of the best ways to be prepared! There will be a First Aid/CPR/AED class held on Saturday, Sept 13th from 9:00 a.m. to noon in Longview through the Parks and Rec department. For cost and location information, contact Longview Parks and Rec at 442-5400.

Saturday, September 6, 2014

Home Hazard Hunt

To prevent injuries, take the time to secure your space.  Secure items that might fall, fly or slide in an earthquake (see www.earthquakecountry.org/step1).  Imagine if the room was picked up and shaken up and down and side to side and then determine what items would be thrown around.  Periodically review the locations where you spend time--your home, workplace, or school--to look for potential hazards and secure them.

1.  Cabinet doors can fly open allowing contents to crash to the floor; secure them with latches.

2.  Objects such as framed photos, books, lamps, and other items you keep on shelves and tables can become flying hazards.  Secure them with hooks, adhesives, or earthquake putty to keep them in place.  Move heavy or breakable items to lower shelves.

3.  Mirrors, picture frames and other hanging items should be secured to the wall with closed hooks or earthquake putty.  Do not hang heavy objects over beds, sofas or any place you may be seated.

4.  Electronics such as computers, televisions and microwave ovens are heavy and expensive to replace.  Secure them with flexible nylon straps.

5.  Bookcases, filing cabinets, china cabinets and other tall furniture should be anchored to wall studs or masonry (not drywall).  Use flexible straps that allow them to sway without falling to the floor.

6.  Secure your water heater, refrigerator and other major appliances with the appropriate straps screwed into the wall studs or masonry to help keep them from falling over and rupturing gas or electric connections.  Gas appliances should have flexible connectors to absorb the shaking while reducing the risk of fire.

These adhesives, straps, hooks, latches and putties are available at most hardware and home improvement stores as well as online retailers.